© 2018 UT-ASLTA

Presenter Biographies & Abstracts

This workshop will outline the theories, applications and results of an innovative and successful ASL immersion program for Deaf Education Teachers and Education Interpreters. We will detail an approach to teaching and learning that includes a special focus on the grammar of ASL, fluency in production, and enhanced receptive skills. This approach uses a creative combination of video and live language opportunities to enhance language attitude plan, production skills, receptive skills, ASL analysis, advanced vocabulary, syntax, and register variation in ASL (formal, consultative, informal and intimate). The workshop will outline a successful curriculum that integrates these language- based goals along with cultural discourse identities that lend themselves to more effective use of ASL and understanding about the role of culture and collaboration in successful alliances. We will showcase hands on activities and model ideas that have generated positive outcomes without compromising high expectations for language skills and cultural sensitivity.

Bruce Bucci and Andrew Bottoms

ASL immersion program for Deaf Education Teachers and Education Interpreters

June 29 - 10:15 - Session A - Tag: L1

Mr. Bruce Bucci has worked in the field of Deaf Education for 20 years as a teacher, team leader, workshop presenter (Deaf Education, Leadership and Organizational Change), ASL storyteller, and Instructor (McDaniel College, Holy Cross College, Rhode Island College and Boston University). He has a BA from Rhode Island College, a MEd from McDaniel College and an EdS from Gallaudet University. He currently teaches Deaf Education Practicum, Deaf Literature, ASL Literature, Deaf Culture and History, and American Sign Language (ASL) as a second language. Mr. Bucci’s research includes the impact of a teacher’s ASL fluency skills in content area on Deaf students’ learning achievements in each content area. Currently, he serves as Director of Deaf Studies programs and Co- Advisor for the Deaf Studies Club.

Andrew R. Bottoms was born and raised in a Deaf family from North Carolina. American Sign Language (ASL) is his native language. Bottoms graduated from Gallaudet University with two bachelor degrees, one in American Sign Language (ASL) and the other in Deaf Studies. When the Masters in Sign Language Teaching program was unveiled at Gallaudet University, he took the amazing opportunity to further his career in the study of ASL. Bottoms is driven by his passion and fervor toward teaching ASL and his values in the sharing of the language and culture embodied by ASL. His specialization lies in the sphere of ASL Literature.

Robert DeMayo is a Connecticut-born  actor, educator and ASL consultant  currently residing in Philadelphia. Robert attended the National Technical Institute for the Deaf in Rochester, New York and toured professionally with Sunshine Too, Cleveland Sign Stage Theatre and the Tony Award-winning National Theatre of the Deaf. He is one of the subjects of See What I’m Saying: The Deaf Entertainers Documentary.

Hilari Scarl directed the award-winning feature See What I’m Saying: The Deaf Entertainers Documentary, was featured on Steven Spielberg’s On the Lot, produced shows for CBS, TLC, Court TV, Fox and the History Channel  and performed as a voicing actress with the Tony Award-winning National Theatre of the Deaf with  Robert DeMayo. She produced No Ordinary Hero: The SuperDeafy Movie with John Maucere and Marlee Matlin.

http://www.signwithrobert.com/

SIGN WITH ROBERT is a new and exciting teaching tool for educators, students, parents, and individuals of all levels who wish to improve their signing skills and knowledge about Deaf culture. Featuring acclaimed Deaf actor/ASL consultant  Robert DeMayo, SIGN WITH ROBERT provides over 15 hours of engaging and  informative lessons on wide-ranging topics such as science signs, business  vocabulary, ASL stories for young children, unique insights into Deaf culture, receptive practice, Deaf history and much more! Each of the 30 episodes is 25 minutes long, with each episode segmented into 4-6 minute chapters based on specific topics. The series is directed by award-winning filmmaker Hilari Scarl (See What I’m Saying, No Ordinary Hero) and is available to stream to your entire school, download for your classroom or view on our 10-DVD collection. The ASLTA presentation will show clips from the series and provide teaching tools, games and topics for discussion.

Robert DeMayo and Hilari Scarl

ASL immersion program for Deaf Education Teachers and Education Interpreters

June 29 - 10:15 - Session B - Tag: L2

Are you looking for more effective ways to incorporate teaching ASL classifiers in your ASL classes? Many ASL teachers have developed additional lessons in teaching ASL classifiers but feel something is missing and are looking for new ideas on how to emphasize ASL classifiers in their teaching. This presentation will discuss basic information on classifiers and offer some ideas in teaching ASL classifiers such as teaching strategies, technology use, activities, and evaluations. The Deaf presenter will demonstrate how he connects his ASL classifiers lessons to the Signing Naturally textbooks.

Anthony Isaacs is culturally Deaf, and he currently is teaching ASL at the University of Kentucky. He has obtained his two bachelor’s degrees from Gallaudet University and his master’s degree in Deaf Education at McDaniel College in Maryland. He has taught at the college level since 2008. He loves signing ABC stories and has posted some of his ABC stories on Facebook.

Anthony Isaacs

Introduce Your Students to ASL Classifiers

June 29 - 10:15 - Session C - Tag: L2

Christine Multra Kraft, MA, CDI, ASLTA Professional, has been passionate about ASL and Language development for the past 24 years.  She serves as Professional Development chair on the National ASLTA Board and is a faculty member at the Sorenson VRS Interpreting Institute.  Christine is pursuing her doctorate in Applied Linguistics at Ball State University, lives near Indianapolis, and enjoys a continuing series of family adventures with her husband, Roger, and their four C/KODA children

Opening with a dissection of conversational dynamics and how culture impacts conversation behavior, strategies to teach and practice this in all levels of ASL classes will be discussed.   Guiding students in their explorations of conversation functions through video work, observation/labelling, and guided practice pays off with students more confident in their ASL interactions.  Both one-on-one and group conversation mastery practice activities can be integrated into lesson plans.  Strategies for teaching students to explore and learn specific vocabulary/NMM for opening, introducing, switching topics; maintaining conversations; holding the floor; interrupting; backchannelling; and closing dialogues will be shared along with assessment techniques. 

Christine Multra Kraft

Mastering the ASL Conversation: Teaching and Discussing ASL Conversation Regulators

June 29 - 10:15 - Session D - Tag: Linguistics

Many hearing undergraduate students are taking American Sign Language classes at California State University, Fresno, also popularly known as Fresno State. More and more frequently, hearing students are attending ASL Level Four classes, in which deaf-friendly design outside of the classroom is not well-understood or implemented. "Deaf Space and Service Learning" is a set of principles which provide an in-depth understanding of communication and Deaf culture outside of the classroom. ASL IV students must attend a "Deaf Space" room where the use of ASL-only is required. These students also need to complete 15 or more service learning hours by participating at the local Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services Center (DHHSC) and the Fresno State ASL Club’s community events. Primarily, the idea of establishing these community connections is what guided the deaf-friendly design experience outside of the classroom.

Dr. Janice Smith-Warshaw is an Assistant Professor at the California State University, Fresno. Prior to working at Fresno State, she was the Superintendent at the Illinois School for the Deaf (ISD) from 2013 to 2015. She was the principal of several different programs over the years in Early Childhood Education, High School, 5th Year post-HS program, Physical Education, and was also the Curriculum Supervisor at the California School for the Deaf, Riverside, for 13 years. Dr. Smith-Warshaw received her B.S. in Management Science from the University of South Carolina, M.A. in Deaf Education from McDaniel College (formerly Western Maryland College), Ed.S. in Change Leadership from Gallaudet University, and Ed.D. in Leadership for Educational Justice from the University of Redlands.

Dr. Janice Smith-Warshaw

Community Connections at Fresno State: Deaf Space and Service Learning

June 29 - 10:15 - Session E - Tag: Social Justice

Elizabeth (Beth) Siebert is an Assistant Professor in the ASL/Interpreting Department at St. Catherine University in St. Paul, MN - one of only 13 BA programs in the nation accredited by the CCIE (Commission on Collegiate Interpreter Education). She has been teaching ASL for over 30 years. In addition to academic degrees from Gallaudet University, she holds a national certification in ASL instruction from ASLTA. She has authored numerous workbooks for students that in CD format that serve as supplemental texts in ASL courses. She also has expanded this work to include the conversion of the department’s beginning ASL course to a hybrid format and the first ASL I course launched in Fall 2015. She is currently developing the hybrid for ASL II.

Bradley E. Neubarth is a native ASL signer from Minnesota.  He was raised in a farming community in a hearing family.  Brad has taught American Sign Language classes at the University of Minnesota since 2004.  In addition to his full-time teaching position with the University of Minnesota, he holds an adjunct faculty position at St. Catherine University for 11 years.  He is passionately committed to his students’ success and providing them the valuable experience cross-cultural learning.  Outside of teaching, Brad is deeply involved as a community leader in the Twin Cities Deaf Community.  He enjoys gardening and spending time with family and friends.

Developing or creating an effective hybrid/blended/flipped ASL course can be intimidating. In this interactive workshop, the following questions will be addressed. What does an effective hybrid ASL course look like? What content should be taught online and what should be taught in the traditional face-to-face class? How and when do the instructor and students interact with each other online? How do we build this format with effective online materials? Does this instructional method support mastery of the course content and progression to higher levels of fluency? Along with addressing these questions, information on how to develop a hybrid course will be presented, including a demonstration of a hybrid ASL I course developed by the presenter The goal of this workshop is to encourage ASL instructors to consider the benefits and challenges of creating hybrid courses.

Beth Siebert and Bradley Neubarth

ASL COURSE, ME DEVELOP ONLINE ME???

June 29 - 10:15 - Session F - Tag: Technology

The aim of this workshop is to introduce the concept of a standard in the in the recording and preservation of academic ASL. There are various written formats for academic reports (i.e. APA, MLA) however, there is a lack of any standardized format for signed languages in academia. Since signed languages are visual, there are different parameters to consider. This workshop will explore those parameters and the importance of establishing standards for ASL in academia, as well as teaching technical skills that can be used to implement such a standard.

Brandon Hill was the third Deaf child born to a large family. Growing up, he lived in many different places, but ultimately attended and graduated from Minnesota State Academy of the Deaf. Upon graduation, he attended Gallaudet University, in Washington, DC where he earned a bachelor’s degree in graphic design and a master’s degree in Sign Language Education. Brandon works full-time as the ASL Advisor for Convo. He has been an instructor for several years, teaching ASL classes at local universities and Sign Language Media Production in the MASLT program at Gallaudet University. Brandon is happily married and adores his wife and two children.

Brandon Hill

Raising the Bar : Setting a Standard for Academic ASL

June 29 - 1:00 - Session A - Tag: L1

Patricia McCarthy has been an ASL teacher over 20 years at the high school and college levels.  Patricia was one of the original members of the ASL National Honor Society in 2006 and is currently the Membership Coordinator. Teaching has rarely felt like a burden, but a way to share her passion for the language.  Over the years, McCarthy has presented at FASLTA, OASLTA and ASLTA on various topics from “Grouping & Paring Students” to “GLOG-for-for”.  She happily shares materials in the hopes of raising the bar of ASL instruction. McCarthy was awarded teacher of the month by Long Island 12 News and Dowling college. Contact her at DeafinitelyASL@aol.com.

Holidays come and go but are an exciting times to be celebrated. Students enjoy discussing holidays and can make the conversation more meaningful and relevant.  Ever consider incorporating holidays into your instructional time rather than mentioning on the actual day? Enjoy expanding your curriculum with holiday activities.  This workshop will be hands on for the participants.  The activities include paper and pencil, independent and group work, YouTube segments and others.  Participants will have an opportunity to perform some activities.   Holidays include Halloween, Thanksgiving, and winter events.

Patricia McCarthy

Using Holidays to teach ASL

June 29 - 1:00 - Session B - Tag: L2

In spring 2015, a nationwide survey of ASL Instructors at the postsecondary level on American Sign Language Curriculum and Materials was conducted. Some questions the survey addressed included curriculum utilized as well as perceived gaps. The three most widely used curriculum indicated from survey results were Signing Naturally, Master ASL and Learning American Sign Language. This round-table discussion will engage participants in open dialogue based on survey results and garner ideas and feedback regarding ASL curriculum, instruction and perceived gaps and in order to generate new ideas and approaches for instructors to utilize.

April Haggard and Michelle Swaney

Round-table Discussion on ASL Curriculum & Instruction

June 29 - 1:00 - Session C - Tag: Curriclum

April Haggard is a Lecturer in the department of the Education of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing and Educational Interpreting program in the department of Theory & Practice in the Teacher Education at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN. She has been teaching ASL for 15 years. She was previously employed at Maryville College as a coordinator and teaching all of levels of ASL. She is President of Tennessee Association of the Deaf and is very active leader within this organization serving different offices. She has MA degree from Gallaudet University in Sign Language Education.

Michelle Swaney is a Lecturer in the Education of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing and Educational Interpreting programs in the department of Theory & Practice in Teacher Education at the University of Tennessee. Michelle is RID nationally certified interpreter, Coordinator of the Sign Language Proficiency Interview (SLPI) at the University of Tennessee, and has considerable experience in making online technology accessible for Deaf and Hard of Hearing individuals. She has 22 years of experience in the field of deafness and her research interests include American Sign Language (curriculum, materials, teaching, and flipped classroom approach) as well as online education and accessibility.

Damon Johnson, MA, is an ASL Teacher and Deaf Mentor. He currently teaches at Chanhassen High School, MN. His past teaching experiences include; St. Paul College, Anoka Ramsey Community College, and North Hennepin Community College. Damon has presented various workshops on: “Deaf Mentor: Who ME?!,” “Familialism,” “ASL: The Beauty of Language and Culture,” “Subtle Changes Makes All the Difference: Dynamic Connotations of Semantics,” and “Classifier Depiction: More Than Just Handshapes,” He has a Master’s Degree in Education from Capella University and a Master’s Degree in Sign Language Eduction from Gallaudet University. He resides in the northern suburbs of Twin Cities with his wife and four children.

Over the years, the climate of classroom instruction has been uniform with minimal changes to how we teach students. Shifting the focus from teacher-centered instruction to a student-centered learning experience by implementing comprehensive pedagogical and technological opportunities, providing a personalized learning experience for each student. A personal journey of imagining, designing, implementing and redesigning a personalized learning approach allowing students to personally develop skills and achieve academic success. The workshop expands on the concept of personalized learning discussing the roles teachers and students are assigned and the comprehensive approach to personalized learning facilitating technology and lesson planning.

Damon Johnson

Flexing students out: A Personalized Approach to Second Language Instruction in High School Settings

June 29 - 1:00 - Session D - Tag: High School

Semantics can be an area of challenge when teaching ASL to English users. They often want to connect each ASL sign to one English word, but we know that is not possible. As teachers, we often tell our students, “It’s all about context,” but there are ways we can discuss semantics with more depth. This workshop goes beyond the context to show the three-dimensional web of connections between multiple meanings, synonyms, connotations, registers, idioms, and allusions. Using information from linguistic research and pedagogy, we will discuss the variety of ways that meaning can be expressed in ASL and English.

Pamela Wright Moers is an educational linguist from the Denver area who is interested in studying the areas where language, education, and culture intersect. Her research as a student at the University of Colorado has focused on language endangerment, diversity in sign language, third-world sign languages, and the phonological and semantic structures found in ASL.

Pamela Wright Moers

Distribution of Meaning

June 29 - 1:00 - Session E - Tag: Linguistics

Nicholas Lalanne is a Deaf instructor of Deaf Studies program at Holyoke Community College in Massachusetts. His past teaching experience includes Springfield Technical Community College, Community College of Vermont in Rutland, VT, and Southern Vermont College. He has a Master’s degree in Sign Language Education from Gallaudet University. He resides in southeastern Vermont with his wife and four children.

Educational programs are shifting their assessment designs from paper-pencil testing (PPT) to computer-based testing (CBT). There are concerns regarding the differences between deploying PPT and CBT types of tests. Students taking the CBT may have an advantage due to their ability to replay videos multiple times. The findings from research indicate little or no significant differences in grade scores between PPT and CBT. Evidence shows that students are more motivated taking CBT rather than taking PPT. One advantage of taking CBT is that it reduces students’ anxiety. Currently, educators are questioning their assessment designs and asking, “How do we, as educators, design a computer-based test that is accessible, reliable and valid for ASL courses?” This workshop will discuss several valid assessment design options that increases practicality, reliability, and authenticity for ASL instruction.

Nicholas Lalanne

Design a Computer-Based Test for American Sign Language Courses

June 29 - 1:00 - Session F - Tag: Technology

This workshop will discuss some commonly used signs that can be bothersome to those using ASL, for example, signs whose productions can have oral/aural influence.  Reasons for these changes in production will be discussed, and different signs have shown to be identified.  It has to do with the historically evolved signs from the post-oralism to the period of the oralism.  The goal of this workshop is to reduce the nuisances in American Sign Language to get back on the right track of the originality of American Sign Language.  The audience can share it to disagree or agree with these signs to be standardized.

Bo Clements is from Tampa, Florida. He is a currently president of the Florida American Sign Language Teachers Association, Inc.  Also, He is the southeast regional director of ASLTA chapters. He holds ASLTA Professional level certification.  He has taught ASL studies at the University of South Florida for going on 19th year.  Bo is a graduate of Gallaudet University with a B.A. degree and also holds an M.S. degree from Florida State University. He is active in the Tampa Bay Deaf Community, and presents workshops at FASLTA, FFLA, and local businesses, such as Chase Corporate – Banks, to educate their employees about Deaf Culture and how best to communicate with their Deaf and Hard of Hearing co-workers and customers via ASL. Bo loves Modern Art, collecting Tiki figures, going to the beach, and traveling. He is a proudly daddy of DODA (Dog of Deaf Adult) - Ryley, a golden retriever. Ryley already knows 15+ signs.

Bo Clements

Nuisances in American Sign Language: How to De-Oralize Your Signing

June 29 - 3:00 - Session A - Tag: L2

Sheryl Cooper is an Associate Professor and the Coordinator of the Deaf Studies Program at Towson University in MD. She was the founding coordinator of this program in 2000, and has been its coordinator since that time.  She earned her Ph.D. from Gallaudet University in Educational Supervision and Administration, Master's degree from New York University in Deafness Rehabiliation, and Bachelor's degree from the University of Pennsylvania in Communication.  She has been a certified interpreter since 1980, and taught in the Interpreter Preparation Program at the Community College of Baltimore County for 18 years. She is a member of RID, PCRID, NAD, the Maryland Association of the Deaf, the American Association of the Deafblind, and the Metro Washington Association of the Deafblind. She chaired the 2006 AADB Conference at Towson University.

A few short surveys published in 1982 and 1984 marked the beginning of research on teaching sign language in post-secondary institutions. In 1994-1995, this researcher collected data from over 300 colleges and universities where sign language was taught, providing a baseline of data on the structure, content, teaching, administration, and resources in post-secondary sign language programs. In 2004, she conducted a follow-up survey to see what changes had occurred in the 10-year interim, and she repeated the study again in 2016.  This presentation will compare data across more than three decades, showing how ASL has emerged as an academic subject on campuses around the United States, and how this is impacted by the presence of Deaf teachers and administrators, and advances in technology and curricula.  Data include descriptive and comparative information on institutions, faculty (gender, hearing status, age, minority status, teaching experience), program content and resources, administrative oversight, and more.

Dr. Sheryl Cooper

The Status of Sign Language Instruction in Institutions of Higher Education: 1982-2016

June 29 - 3:00 - Session B - Tag: Research

ASL Language mentors form professional relationships with people wanting to get direct support with their ASL abilities.  Like a personal trainer, the ASL Language mentor works with their mentee to create a individualized skill development program that builds up on their available skills, focuses on filling in the knowledge/ability gaps and helps them push the limit on what they can do.  A key component to successful mentoring is to foster the mentee’s ability to evaluate their own progress and make decisions about priorities and goals.  The mentor provides guidance and support, helping to create objectives leading into the pair choosing specific tasks/assignments aimed at developing skills.  Reflection and re-assessment of their abilities/progress needs to be done by the mentee regularly with discussion with the mentor to ensure the mentoring stays on track.

The VRSII Language Mentoring team will share their experiences with creating successful mentoring relationships, tips for adapting ASL classroom activities into a one-on-one skill development series, plus specific ways to enable and inspire the mentee to honestly assess their own skills and apply their energy toward positive growth.

The VRS Interpreting Institute (VRSII) Language Mentor team includes: Samond Bishara MA, CDI; Leslie Janda Decker, MA, DI; Tim Gough MA; Shanna Grossinger MA; Christine Multra Kraft MA, CDI, ASLTA Prof; Robin O’Brien MA; and Max Williamson, MA, DI, ASLTA Qualified. The team mentors interpreters for two VRSII programs: Pathways Internship Program (a VRS internship) and COMPASS (training program for Deaf-parented interpreters). Combined, this group has over 120 years experience teaching and working with ASL.

VRSII Language Mentoring Team

ASL Language Mentoring: More than just giving feedback! Strategies from a Language Mentoring team.

June 29 - 3:00 - Session C - Tag: L2

David Solis has worked as the ASL lab director for 15 years.  He is very creative with activities to do involving students.  David is a master at meeting them at their level.  His lab is a very safe place to practice what is done in the classroom.  

 

Melody Hull holds ASLTA Professional Certification. She has been teaching ASL for more than 25 years.  Her passion is the beginning semester, ASL 1.   She works with David to think of ways to support and encourage those beginners.

Are your students meeting their potential? Do you make effective use of learning outside of the classroom? Do you want to maximize student engagement? If you want to know how to get the most benefit for your students join us for an informative session on getting the most out of your department’s ASL lab! San Antonio College is a nationally accredited program and we will share best practices from our 20 plus years of effective use of classroom activities and teaching with supplemental work in the ASL lab. 

David Solis and Melody Hull

Coursework Meets Practice in the Lab: Take Your ASL Classes to the Next Level

June 29 - 3:00 - Session D - Tag: Curriclum

Problem: Over a million high school and college students take ASL courses annually, but most lose their skills after completing their courses. If students retained and used their ASL skills, imagine what a wonderful ASL-Elevated world we would live in!

 

Program: This workshop will give participants the tools they need to transform their students into life-long ASL communicators by: 1. Helping ASL students incorporate stronger motivating reasons and Deaf Gain concepts into their learning processes.

2. Teaching through a task-based communicative approach that involves ALL ASL students in class activities.

3. Showing students how to use fictional and historical storytelling to develop  fluency in ASL.

Dr. Don Bangs has been teaching ASL, Deaf Studies, ASL Linguistics and Bilingual Education for over fifty years. He has organized numerous teacher-training programs and workshops in the U.S. as well as in Brazil, Malaysia, Singapore, and Thailand.  He is the creator of a new textbook series, My ASL Book , Levels 1, 2, and 3 and a companion website www.myasltube.com, both of which have been transforming ASL instruction in schools, colleges and universities across the U.S.A. He holds a Doctorate in Dramatic Literature (ASL focus), two Master’s Degrees in Deaf Education and in Television and Film (ASL focus), and a Graduate Certificate in Second/Foreign Language Teaching from U.C., Berkeley. He has developed 13 plays about the Deaf cultural experience, all of them produced in various locations in the U.S.

Dr. Don Bangs

Transforming Your Students Into Life-Long ASL Communicators

June 29 - 3:00 - Session E - Tag: L2

Keith Gamache, Jr. is a native Californian and is well-traveled through the states.  He is Deaf of Deaf parents and has a large number of Deaf relatives.  He graduated from California School for the Deaf in Riverside.  He has a bachelors’ degree in history and a masters’ degree in teaching.  He is currently a doctorate student studying interpretation at Gallaudet University.  He maintains a professional ASLTA certification and a CDI certification. He has taught courses in ASL, Deaf Studies, and Interpreting for twenty years.  He works as a freelance interpreter and gives presentations on the side.   He currently teaches ASL at Irvine Valley College in Irvine, CA.  He is married with four children.

The use of literature is believed to be one of the keys in learning a language.  There is an explosion of available ASL videos on DVD, YouTube, and websites with ASL vlogs in recent years.  How would you be able to use them to your advantage in the ASL classroom?  They can be used as a learning resource to enhance the teaching and learning process in schools.  We are facing a rising generation who are tech savvy and relies on internet applications and social networks for information.  The workshop suggests a five-step process:  finding a videotext, record a vocabulary list, identifying its linguistic features, assigning text to category or categories, and creating relevant activities.  The workshop will include an explanation of key concepts and a demonstration.  The participants will then participate in a sample videotext using the same approach and to discuss their experiences at the end of the workshop

Keith Gamache, Jr.

Finding and Applying ASL Videotexts for Classroom Use

June 29 - 3:00 - Session F - Tag: Technology

The presenters will discuss head movements and their vital grammatical and discourse functions in American Sign Language. The study is based on their teaching experiences with ASL and interpretation students and their studies with the ASL signers in videotapes. Head movements are critical features in ASL and they need to be emphasized in the classes. Head movements are alike using patterns of rhythms, stress, and intonation in a language. They are analogous to the use of punctuation, such as commas, semicolons, and spaces between sentences and paragraphs. The presenters will demonstrate several examples of head movements that co-occur with certain words and fingerspelling, as well as their use as grammatical and discourse markers and in managing listener’s feedback. The presenters will discuss some strategies for use in ASL and interpretation classes, which will include teaching head movement for students to improve their ASL expressive and receptive skills, and interpreting skills.

Dr. Keith Cagle and Sharon Lott

ASL Head Movements - Critical Features in ASL and Interpretation Teaching

June 30 - 1:00 - Session A & B - Tag: Research

Dr. Keith M. Cagle currently is the associate professor and coordinator of BA in Interpretation program in Department of Interpretation at Gallaudet University. He received his Ph.D. in Educational Linguistics from the University of New Mexico. He has been teaching the undergraduate and graduate ASL and interpreting courses since 1986.  He was the Interpreter Education program chair at Central Piedmont Community College (CPCC). He led the curriculum revisions on some ASL and interpreting courses and program for four interpreting training programs in North Carolina. He developed some undergraduate courses at NTID, Gardner-Webb University and CPCC, and some graduate courses for the University of Northern Colorado.  He was American Sign Language Teachers Association (ASLTA) president in 1990-1995 and Evaluation chairperson in 2000-2015. He has served on North Carolina interpreter licensing board, and on the national and state committees for ASL bill, standards, outcomes and screening.

Sharon Lott, M.S., M.A., ASLTA Professional certification, is Assistant Professor at Eastern Kentucky University.  She serves on NCASLTA board as Professional Development chair since 2012. She was the past president of NC ASLTA, 2010-2012. She was on the national ASLTA board as Professional Development chair for 4 years.  She received NC ASLTA George W. Veditz Leadership Award in Nov. 2010, and ASLTA Alan R. Barwiolek Distinguished Award in July, 2013.  She produced “Country, State and City signs” DVD at NCSD.  She lectured several topics of “Introduction to Teaching”, “Activities in ASL classes”, “How to introduce Grammar”, “Teaching Deaf Culture” on the DVDs of “About ASL Teaching” produced by CSD-TV.  Keith Cagle and she co-authored a book “GA-SK Etiquette.  She provides numerous workshops, especially on her specialty of lexicalized and semantic fingerspelling.

Regan Thibodeau is passionate about the impact of ASL in Education, Interpreting, and Deaf people. She wants to share the idea of elevating instructional standards and reframing our pedagogy so that we can teach from a new place that supports the influx of Deaf people becoming prominent members in our rapidly evolving society. Regan is in a doctoral program cohort working toward a PhD in Public Policy with a concentration in Educational Leadership and Policy with the hopes that she can bring the impact of ASL to a new level.

As requested, ASL Flash returns to talk about signing conceptually on the phrasal level and to dive further into the concept of sign-roots. How the 5 parameters are embedded in our sign play and how they support what we say as being conceptually accurate.

Regan Thibodeau

ASL Flash: A Sequel

June 30 - 1:00 - Session C - Tag: L2

This workshop will introduce participants to the process of developing a course that prepares students to become an engaged scholar using the participatory approach to teaching American Sign Language.   After completing a series of language courses with a strong Deaf Studies component and learning media production skills, students can enroll into a course designed to collaborate with the Deaf community on a semester-long project.  Through community engagement, students will use their advanced ASL skills on projects designed to raise awareness and lead to positive change in the community.   Participants will learn about model courses which have used community engagement, including a report of the results of an engaged scholars ASL course at Brown University during spring 2017.   Some successes and challenges will be discussed, including what it means to be a Deaf ally, the role of students as engaged scholars, and engaging the Deaf community using a transformative approach.

Timothy Riker is a Lecturer at Brown University, where he teaches American Sign Language and Deaf Studies. He also serves as Chair of the Rhode Island Commission on the Deaf and Hard of Hearing, coordinator of the National Association of the Deaf Language Deprivation Taskforce, and on the board of the Deafhood Foundation. Riker is a Certified Deaf Interpreter (CDI) and provides Deaf Self-Advocacy Training (DSAT) as a master trainer. Riker’s parents and older brother are Deaf and he is an alumnus of Maryland School for the Deaf. He is a second generation Deaf person and a native signer of ASL. Riker earned his B.S. in Business Administration from Georgetown University. In addition to completing graduate coursework at California State University, Northridge’s Masters in Public Policy program, he earned his Masters in Sign Language Education from Gallaudet University.

Timothy Riker

Teaching American Sign Language Learners to Become Engaged Scholars in the 21st Century

June 30 - 1:00 - Session D - Tag: Deaf Studies/ASL

Joseph Featherstone has a Masters in English/ASL Interpreting: Interpreter Pedagogy from the University of North Florida, and has a Bachelors in Recreational Therapy and Management from Brigham Young University. He is a Certified Deaf Interpreter (CDI), has an ASLTA Provisionally certification, a licensed whitewater river guide, and a licensed ski instructor. Joseph has been teaching ASL for 10 years at the college/university level. He previously worked at VRS Interpreting Institute and is currently working at GoReact while teaching on the side. Joseph is an avid outdoorsman, and loves to be outside when possible. During his college years, he would work as a river guide during the summer to make money to pay for school. He also loves to be with his wife and two kids who are currently 3 and 1 years old.

There are always a few teachers that just do it right, and when they teach, they have our undivided attention. What do they do that makes us want to learn? What do they do that makes us not want to blink? The book “What best college teachers do” Dr. Ken Bain conducted a research from teachers from all over the country in all disciplines, and found common themes in the best and most effective teachers. This research will be the foundation of the workshop along with my experience and research and will be covering the following questions in ASL teachers:

1.  What do the best ASL teachers know and understand?  2. How do they prepare to teach?  3. What do they expect of their students? 4. What do they do when they teach?  5. How do they treat students.   6. How do they check their progress and evaluate their efforts.

Joseph Featherstone

What the Best ASL Teachers Do: Examining Traits and Characteristics of the Best ASL Teachers.

June 30 - 1:00 - Session E - Tag: Admin

This presentation will explain how The University of Tennessee (UTK) is utilizing Canvas to maximize ASL instruction and increase course rigor to develop standardization in our program. The UTK program has experienced exponential growth since fall 2012 with enrollment in all ASL courses increasing by 58%, the number of courses offered increasing by 57% and the number of ASL instructors increasing by 60%. With the increase of ASL courses, instructors and students, the need to standardize instruction and increase classroom instruction was critical. To meet the demand and increase rigor, the UTK program began implementing the use of technology to provide testing and increase expressive and receptive skills in ASL students. The process began with Blackboard until the University migrated to Canvas. Canvas is proving to be more efficient and user-friendly in conducting testing and creating standardization across all ASL courses.

April Haggard and Michelle Swaney

Canvas: Maximizing ASL Instruction

June 30 - 1:00 - Session F - Tag: Technology

April Haggard is a Lecturer in the department of the Education of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing and Educational Interpreting program in the department of Theory & Practice in the Teacher Education at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN. She has been teaching ASL for 15 years. She was previously employed at Maryville College as a coordinator and teaching all of levels of ASL. She is President of Tennessee Association of the Deaf and is very active leader within this organization serving different offices. She has MA degree from Gallaudet University in Sign Language Education.

Michelle Swaney is a Lecturer in the Education of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing and Educational Interpreting programs in the department of Theory & Practice in Teacher Education at the University of Tennessee. Michelle is RID nationally certified interpreter, Coordinator of the Sign Language Proficiency Interview (SLPI) at the University of Tennessee, and has considerable experience in making online technology accessible for Deaf and Hard of Hearing individuals. She has 22 years of experience in the field of deafness and her research interests include American Sign Language (curriculum, materials, teaching, and flipped classroom approach) as well as online education and accessibility.

Thomas K. Holcomb is Professor at Ohlone College in California where he teaches courses related to Deaf Culture, Deaf Education and Interpreting to both deaf and hearing students.  Previously, he taught at San Jose State University and NTID/RIT. Tom’s academic credentials include a Bachelor’s degree in Psychology from Gallaudet University, Master’s degree in Career and Human Resources Development from Rochester Institute of Technology, and a Ph.D. in Curriculum and Instruction from the University of Rochester.  His published works includes several books including Introduction to American Deaf Culture (2013), and Deaf Culture, Our Way:  Anecdotes from the Deaf Community (2011).  In addition, he has produced several educational tools including See What I Mean:  Differences between Deaf and Hearing Cultures (2009) and A Sign of Respect:  Strategies for Effective Deaf/Hearing Interactions (2007).   Tom was honored with ASLTA’s Stephen Ryan Award in 2002.

Many ASL programs require their students to attend events in the Deaf Community as part of course requirements. However, the benefit of such requirement is often questionable.  Furthermore, Deaf people are losing patience with ASL students who do not exhibit appropriate behavior or respect at the events.  In this workshop, the participants will discover strategies to maximize the deaf event experience for their students and, at the same time, protect the sanctity of the Deaf community.  Such strategies include helping students to identify appropriate events for students to attend, to demonstrate appropriate behavior and attitude when attending an event, to find ways to become an ally, and to process their feelings related to the event attendance.

Dr. Thomas K. Holcomb

Required Deaf Event Attendance:  A Burden on the Deaf Community?

June 30 - 3:00 - Session A & B - Tag: L2

This workshop is a discussion about elevating the standards for performance outcomes in all ASL students as well as streamlining learning outcomes that the ITP student needs as early as possible for building a stronger command of language processing in ASL. This can be done regardless of which course materials are being used and it starts with innovative activities done by you. These activities are made available for your perusal if you come to this workshop!

Regan Thibodeau and Joseph Featherstone

Elevating Standards for ITP students in ASL Classrooms

June 30 - 3:00 - Session C - Tag: L2

Regan Thibodeau is passionate about the impact of ASL in Education, Interpreting, and Deaf people. She wants to share the idea of elevating instructional standards and reframing our pedagogy so that we can teach from a new place that supports the influx of Deaf people becoming prominent members in our rapidly evolving society. Regan is in a doctoral program cohort working toward a PhD in Public Policy with a concentration in Educational Leadership and Policy with the hopes that she can bring the impact of ASL to a new level.

Joseph Featherstone has a Masters in English/ASL Interpreting: Interpreter Pedagogy from the University of North Florida, and has a Bachelors in Recreational Therapy and Management from Brigham Young University. He is a Certified Deaf Interpreter (CDI), has an ASLTA Provisionally certification, a licensed whitewater river guide, and a licensed ski instructor. Joseph has been teaching ASL for 10 years at the college/university level. He previously worked at VRS Interpreting Institute and is currently working at GoReact while teaching on the side. Joseph is an avid outdoorsman, and loves to be outside when possible. During his college years, he would work as a river guide during the summer to make money to pay for school. He also loves to be with his wife and two kids who are currently 3 and 1 years old.

Ben Jarashow, a California native, graduated from Gallaudet University in 2004 with a Bachelor’s degree in Deaf Studies. He obtained his Master’s degree in Deaf Studies: Cultural Studies in 2006, also from Gallaudet University. His Master’s thesis focused on developing criteria for a better quality of ABC storytelling. At the moment, he is pursuing his Ph.D. in the division of Philosophy, Art and Critical Thought of the European Graduate School. He teaches at Utah Valley University with the ASL & Deaf Studies program in the department of Languages and Cultures. He lives in Provo, Utah with his wife, Kat, their children, Boone and Cypress, and their dog, Roseanne Barr, a smelly Boston terrier.

This lecture will focus on a specific ASL Literature genre, Stories with Handshape Constraints.  There are four types of stories with constraints, which are: ABC stories, numbers stories, word stories, and one-handshape stories.  During the course of this lecture, the audience will explore history of each four stories.  Also the audience will learn the appropriate format for each of the four stories and how to create good quality stories with constraints.  These basic principles will also give the audience tools to critique others’ stories with constraints.  Video examples of stories with constraints will be shown and the audience will be able to practice critiquing the stories using tools learned during the presentation.

Ben Jarashow

Basic Principles of Stories with Handshape Constraints

June 30 - 3:00 - Session D - Tag: Deaf Studies/ASL

In the last 20 years, the growing profession of Deaf Studies Programs includes numerous Deaf Staff, Faculty, and Administrators, leading to a greater demand for QUALIFIED interpreters to bridge the communication and cultural gap between these Deaf professionals and students, colleagues, administrators, and community members. Unlike traditional/common interpreting situations, there is a unique need on campuses across the nation for interpreters in these environments to be able to possess specific skills and additional competencies with regards to Higher Ed that allow successful communication and interaction to occur. The presentation is designed to share best practices which include common issues and dilemma and solutions for the Deaf professionals as well as the staff (i.e. service for students with disabilities) that are often assigned the duty of hiring interpreters.  Identifying and understanding the common issues and dilemmas, brainstorming for possible solutions and suggesting the best practices are the objectives of this workshop.

Claire Sanders, M.A., is a department chair of Deaf Studies and a professor at Holyoke Community College in Massachusetts where she teaches various ASL and Deaf Studies courses.  She has been in the American Sign Language and Deaf Studies  field for over 20 years. She also taught at several higher ed institutions.  She holds a Bachelor’s degree in Social Work from Rochester Institute of Technology, Master’s degree in Deaf Education from McDaniel College and Professional ASLTA certificate.

Claire Sanders

Designated Interpreters in the Higher Education Field: Best Practices

June 30 - 3:00 - Session E - Tag: Admin

Sara Pivac Alexander is a New Zealand Sign Language (NZSL) lecturer at Victoria University of Wellington in New Zealand. She teaches NZSL and trains Deaf people to become NZSL teachers. Sara is currently the Project Manager for the Learn NZSL project. She recently authored the TeachSign website, an information and resource hub for NZSL teachers. She is one of the Compilation Editors for the NZSL Online Dictionary. Sara is a member of the founding NZSL Board, to support promotion and maintenance of NZSL by providing expert advice to the government. She is also an active member of the NZSL Teachers Association. Sara hails from a Deaf family and was an AFS exchange high school student to Hinsdale South High School in the United States. 

 

Dr. David McKee is Research Director of Deaf Studies Research Unit and Senior Lecturer in Applied Linguistics at Victoria University of Wellington in New Zealand. He teaches Certificate in Deaf Studies: Teaching New Zealand Sign Language, and NZSL courses.  David is Managing Editor of the Online Dictionary of NZSL. David previously taught at San Diego Mesa College and California State University, Northridge before moving to New Zealand in 1992 where he and Rachel Locker McKee established and taught New Zealand's first full-time sign language interpreter training course at Auckland University of Technology. David went to California School for the Deaf, Riverside and Gallaudet University.

This presentation examines how sign language teaching and learning in New Zealand is being elevated through two projects of national significance: TeachSign and Learn NZSL websites. Although NZSL has been an official language since 2006 and NZSL teaching has been around since the late 1980s, NZSL teachers have relied heavily on adapting the Signing Naturally ASL curriculum, and face-to-face training for NZSL teaching. How do we make NZSL teaching ‘ours’ and resources more readily accessible to a small, dispersed population? In 2014, TeachSign, an online resource and information hub for everything to do with NZSL teaching, was developed. This site offers a NZ based curriculum, with teaching/learning materials, including demonstration videos designed for deaf teachers. Work is currently underway on Learn NZSL, an e-learning website for beginner NZSL learners nationwide that has high production values. These large-scale projects highlight the potential of technology to increase quality, standardization and professionalization of sign language teaching and learning, which plays a critical role in elevating language status.

Sara Pivac Alexander and Dr. David McKee

Digital Innovation Elevates New Zealand Sign Language (NZSL) 

June 30 - 3:00 - Session F - Tag: Technology

In voiced languages the evolution is driven by native speakers. Unfortunately not true for signed languages! In signed languages the evolution is driven by a combination of native signers and non-native signers. The non-native signers have learned the language out of necessity to participate in the community. This workshop traces the evolution of ASL starting in previous centuries and arriving today in our “Modern” world where a combination of culture, technology and stakeholders all drive the evolution. A key part of this workshop will be a discussion as to the evolution and when it is good and bad for the language.

Missy Keast, born Deaf has 4 older siblings one of whom is also Deaf. She has spent most of her life telling stories. Encouraged by friends and family she has become “The Shakespeare of Sign Language.” Her clarity and complexity in the use of ASL is unique. She enrolled at Gallaudet and then transferred to Arizona State University (ASU). While still a student at ASU she began teaching ASL at Mesa Community College. After graduating with a BA in History she toured with National Theatre of the Deaf further sharpening her storytelling skills. 26 years later Missy is still teaching and telling stories. She also published a book, “One Day: Our View”. Aphoto documentary of global deaf culture during the 24 hours of May 1, 1997. With her 3 children ages 12, 10 and 5 all now at the same school Missy is hard at work expanding her online curriculum at ASL Inside. A company she founded to bring the best of ASL to children, families, students and teachers. She also produces weekly VLOG called Missy’s Post, has a one woman show and teaches workshops on “The Art of Teaching.” Finally, she is practicing Shorin-Ryu karate at Peaceful Warrior and should be a black belt in late 2017.

Missy Keast

The Unseen Secret Behind the Evolution of ASL

June 30 - 4:30 - Session C - Tag: L2

Raychelle Harris, a Third generation Deaf and a native ASL signer, received her Bachelors in American Sign Language (ASL) from Gallaudet University and Masters in Deaf Education from Western Maryland College in 1995 and 2000, respectively. Raychelle has been teaching ASL as a first and second language since 1993.  She returned to Gallaudet University for her doctoral studies in the areas of education and linguistics, with her dissertation topic focused on ASL discourse in academic settings. In 2008, Raychelle joined Gallaudet University’s Department of Interpretation as a faculty member. Since 2009, Raychelle has been teaching with the Department of ASL & Deaf Studies, preparing future ASL teachers in the Masters in Sign Language Education program in online and hybrid formats.  She is one of four co-editors of Journal of ASL and Literatures (JASLL) website. Raychelle holds Professional Certification with the American Sign Language Teachers Association (ASLTA) and is a Certified Deaf Interpreter (with BEI).

The Masters in Sign Language Education (MASLED) graduate program is currently the longest-running, existing graduate sign language preparation program for professionals working in educational settings specifically with sign language.  The MASLED program, established in 2011 by Dr. Raychelle Harris, who will be moderating a multi-pronged, open-ended panel covering multiple content areas: 1) Dr. Harris will present an overview of the evolution of the MASLED graduate program, including what kind of changes were implemented over the years based on current trends in the ASL teaching field; then 2) Hosting a panel with multiple MASLED alumni representing each year of the program (2011 through 2016) and then 3) Another panel of MASLED faculty members over the years (Drs. Keith Cagle, Kim Kurz, Curt Radford, and more) and finally, An electronic showcase of the top, award-winning ePortfolios showcased by MASLED alumni.

Dr. Raychelle Harris

The Evolution of Gallaudet University’s Graduate Preparation Program for Sign Language Professionals.

June 30 - 4:30 - Session D - Tag: Deaf Studies/ASL, L2Admin

This year our ASL team will be focusing on fun activities to bring up student motivation.  Many students today have a difficult time staying motivated in ASL classes during a block schedule.  This is largely due to not having enough activities over the course of the period so students become restless and bored easily.  Providing fun activities that enhance grammar, fingerspelling, facial expressions, and eye-contact will not only increase student motivation but also help with classroom management, lesson planning, and reinforcement of the language.

Timothy Trotto and Gerardo Di Pietro

Interactive Class Activities

June 30 - 4:30 - Session E - Tag: L2

Timothy Trotto currently holds a Master’s degree from Gallaudet University.  He has been teaching ASL as a second language to hearing and deaf students since 2007.  He has worked both in the community colleges and high schools.  Currently Mr. Trotto resides in California where he teaches as both Santa Rosa Junior College and Santa Teresa High school.

Gerardo Di Pietro currently teaches ASL classes at Berkeley City College and Skyline College. He truly believes in making sign language come alive for his students.  This helps them embrace the language and become engaged learners. As language and culture always evolve, he received his Masters of Arts in Sign Language Education at Gallaudet University in the summer of 2016.

Several studies have shown that a large part of communication is how we say things—not what we say. This awareness is vital for ASL teachers, interpreters and researchers, yet can be one of the most difficult things to determine while processing information. In this workshop, participants will learn about different types of intonations that occur in ASL and identify the speaker’s intended meaning.  Through discussions and activities, using data and research from interdisciplinary fields, we will analyze tone, prosody, pauses, turn-taking and word choices in ASL and English, and will look at how all of these impact the meaning of what is said.

Pamela Wright Moers is an educational linguist from the Denver area who is interested in studying the areas where language, education, and culture intersect. Her research as a student at the University of Colorado has focused on language endangerment, diversity in sign language, third-world sign languages, and the phonological and semantic structures found in ASL.

Pamela Wright Moers

What’s with the Attitude? The Impact of Intonation on ASL

June 30 - 4:30 - Session F - Tag: Linguistics

Many American Sign Language programs are struggling with retention of ASL students.  Many also deliberate how to engage students into learning ASL. Many Interpreter Preparatory Programs enroll future interpreters that do not know in depth about Deaf people and their culture. How can we as ASL teachers increase our enrollment, have lower dropout rates from our ASL classes and prepare our interpreters to the best of their ability and knowledge of the Deaf community. Teach about Deaf culture and community in your ASL classes! We cannot separate language and culture. General knowledge is that one of the favorite parts of ASL classes are when stories are presented.  ACTFL encourages any language teachers to include the 5 C’s. Few ASL curriculum, textbooks and materials include the 5 C’s. In this workshop participants will understand the importance of sharing cultural anecdotes during your class time. Participants will be able to recognize and find various ASL/Deaf related topics to share in their classroom. The presenter will demonstrate and give examples. Participants will be inspired, not only to teach ASL, but use cultural tidbits in your lessons and classroom.

David A. Martin grew up in the Frederick, MD area and attended the Maryland School for the Deaf. Upon graduation in 1985, David went to Gallaudet and earned his Bachelor of Science in Psychology (1990). David received his Masters in Deaf Education from what was known as Western Maryland College currently known as McDaniel College.  David’s professional career includes jobs as a recruiter for Gallaudet University, teaching drama at the Texas School for the Deaf, teaching kindergarten at the Maryland School for the Deaf, and ASL instructor and the ASL Lab manager for ASL Studies at McDaniel College in Westminster, MD. Currently David is well into his 12th year as Assistant professor and program Manager of ASL Studies Program at Frederick Community College.  David is an active member of the Maryland Chapter of ASLTA. The need for ASL workshops as well as Deaf awareness programs keeps David busy.  David has done many presentations locally and nationally.  David is the recipient of several awards including the Stephen M. Ryan Teacher of the Year award from ASLTA. David has an ongoing hobby of doing ASL Vlogs. David currently resides in Frederick, Md. with his wife Debbie and they have four grown children.

David Martin

Implementing Deaf/ASL Cultural Anecdotes in your ASL Classroom

July 1 - 10:15 - Session A - Tag: Deaf Studies/ASL, L2

Dr. Jason Listman is an Assistant professor in the department of American Sign Language and Interpreting Education (ASLIE) at the National Technical Institute of the Deaf (NTID) at the Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT). He received an Ed.D Degree in Executive Leadership from St. John Fisher College, holds MS in Secondary Education and holds a Bachelor of Science in Psychology, both from RIT. His research interests include mentoring in undergraduate research, resilience characteristics in deaf community, and effectiveness of ASL teaching.

The efficacy of using a person’s native language (their L1) to teach them a second language (L2) has been debated for years in the fields of second language acquisition and American Sign Language pedagogy (Cook, 2001). Currently, the most popular method of teaching ASL to L2 adult learners is known as the Direct Experience Method (DEM) (Newell, Mallery, Menkins, Holcomb, & Arthur, 1980). DEM advocates exclusive use of the target language (ASL in this case) with no use of English as a learning tool in the classroom. To date, there are no existing studies that examine the effectiveness of different teaching approaches for teaching ASL to L2 adult learners. The purpose of this presentation is to share the results of a mixed study comparing the two teaching approaches: the Direct Experience Method versus a second approach which uses L1 (English) as a learning tool to teach L2 learners about ASL grammatical structures. Participants’ opinions about the teaching methods will be discussed as well.

Dr. Jason Listman

The Use of L1 as a Tool to Teach L2

American Sign Language (ASL)

July 1 - 10:15 - Session E - Tag: L2

Andrew Veith, Program Assistant for Community Outreach, Engagement, and CBL at the College of the Holy Cross for the ASL and Deaf Studies program. He also teaches ASL practicum for the College. He is currently studying Deaf Studies at Gallaudet University. He has been actively involved in teaching ASL in various settings for the past 10 years.

 

Dr. Octavian E. Robinson is Assistant Professor of American Sign Language and Deaf Studies at the College of the Holy Cross. He holds the College's first tenure ­track position in Deaf Studies. He has chapters in three collections from Gallaudet University Press in addition to published work with Sage Publications, Facts on File Press, and Sign Language Studies. He holds a Ph.D. degree in History from The Ohio State University.

Students who are introduced to deaf communities through service learning and meditated community involvements develop stronger language and cultural skills. It is critical for students to engage in service-based learning and develop strong, mutually beneficial relationships with the local Deaf community. Teaching from a social justice framework, we explore service-based learning through two different avenues. One is community-based and the other is project-based engagement with the community. Service-based learning, is a pedagogical approach of learning from direct experience with deaf communities and individuals with an emphasis on mutual exchange of benefits. Students also participate in interactions with the local deaf community through carefully curated events hosted by our program to model socially just relationships. Students gain a deeper understanding of course content by integrating theory with practice in the community, and communities gain access to volunteers and resources.

Andrew Veith and Dr. Octavian Robinson

Beyond Observation: Service Learning and Community Involvement for American Sign Language and Deaf Studies Students

July 1 - 10:15 - Session D - Tag: Deaf Studies/ASL, Social Justice

Tired of the same materials? Can you really use that handout one more time?? Try incorporating these two new technology programs into your instructional materials. The first is Kahoot. This is a fun learning game made from a series of multiple choice questions. Add videos, images and diagrams to your questions to amplify engagement! KAHOOT gives the teacher the ability to share with other teachers or create your own specific activity. This type of social learning promotes discussion and pedagogical impact, students can create then share their own kahoots to deepen understanding, mastery and purpose. The second is called Pear Deck which brings interactive, engaging slide presentations to your classroom. Real-time formative assessments and discussions enhance understanding. Pear Deck encourages interaction with peers and allows dialogue. Each of these technology programs can be used as either a do now activity, a review activity or to instruct a full lesson.

Patricia McCarthy has been an ASL teacher over 20 years at the high school and college levels.  Patricia was one of the original members of the ASL National Honor Society in 2006 and is currently the Membership Coordinator. Teaching has rarely felt like a burden, but a way to share her passion for the language.  Over the years, McCarthy has presented at FASLTA, OASLTA and ASLTA on various topics from “Grouping & Paring Students” to “GLOG-for-for”.  She happily shares materials in the hopes of raising the bar of ASL instruction. McCarthy was awarded teacher of the month by Long Island 12 News and Dowling college. Contact her at DeafinitelyASL@aol.com.

Patricia McCarthy

Have you Kahoot or Pear Deck today?

July 1 - 10:15 - Session C - Tag: L2

The ASL program at The University of Tennessee has made changes in its approach to providing ASL student’s exposure to Deaf Culture. The UTK program has experienced exponential growth since fall 2012 with enrollment in all ASL courses increasing by 58%. With the increase of ASL courses, the numbers of students required to attend Deaf events skyrocketed but the number of Deaf related events did not match the increased need. Our program learned from the Deaf community that there were concerns about having large numbers of hearing students attend Deaf events. The UTK ASL program learned strategies from the Spanish program on increasing student understanding of the Spanish culture. Therefore, we implemented new strategies into our courses. The UTK ASL program has seen a very positive impact and response from students regarding activities that have been implemented in ASL courses in lieu of a large number of required Deaf events.

April Haggard and Michelle Swaney

Developing Cultural Competency through ASL Courses

July 1 - 3:00 - Session A - Tag: L2

April Haggard is a Lecturer in the department of the Education of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing and Educational Interpreting program in the department of Theory & Practice in the Teacher Education at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN. She has been teaching ASL for 15 years. She was previously employed at Maryville College as a coordinator and teaching all of levels of ASL. She is President of Tennessee Association of the Deaf and is very active leader within this organization serving different offices. She has MA degree from Gallaudet University in Sign Language Education.

Michelle Swaney is a Lecturer in the Education of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing and Educational Interpreting programs in the department of Theory & Practice in Teacher Education at the University of Tennessee. Michelle is RID nationally certified interpreter, Coordinator of the Sign Language Proficiency Interview (SLPI) at the University of Tennessee, and has considerable experience in making online technology accessible for Deaf and Hard of Hearing individuals. She has 22 years of experience in the field of deafness and her research interests include American Sign Language (curriculum, materials, teaching, and flipped classroom approach) as well as online education and accessibility.

Regan Thibodeau is passionate about the impact of ASL in Education, Interpreting, and Deaf people. She wants to share the idea of elevating instructional standards and reframing our pedagogy so that we can teach from a new place that supports the influx of Deaf people becoming prominent members in our rapidly evolving society. Regan is in a doctoral program cohort working toward a PhD in Public Policy with a concentration in Educational Leadership and Policy with the hopes that she can bring the impact of ASL to a new level.

Often students learn about the Deaf World as bystanders, like people at the museum looking at the Masterpieces, but what if we taught the course in a way that the students became aware of their active roles in the Deaf World? It begins with reframing. We can talk about who we are, identify our power and privilege, and then we can talk about our impact on each other thus our impact on the Deaf World. An active perspective means that students will engage in a critical inquiry about where information about deaf people come from as well as their responses to events that pertain deaf people.

Regan Thibodeau

Reframing Introduction to Deaf World for Students

July 1 - 3:00 - Session B - Tag: L2

This presentation proposes the use of social justice frameworks in teaching ASL and Deaf Studies. Research has shown that using social justice frameworks in teaching helps improve student retention in programs, student graduation rates, and relationships between students and faculty. The value of using the social justice framework is apparent with the changing demographics of our student populations, the increasing emphasis placed on minority student recruitment and retention among higher education institutions, and national conversations about equity. After exploring the benefits of using social justice frameworks, the talk will explore a variety of social justice applications to syllabi and assignment design while considering how we use canonical texts in teaching ASL and Deaf Studies. The talk will conclude with reflection on how to avoid microaggressions in teaching ASL while promoting authentic encounters with Deaf/DeafBlind/DeafDisabled/Hard of Hearing people through service based learning and meditated contact.

Dr. Octavian E. Robinson is Assistant Professor of American Sign Language and Deaf Studies at the College of the Holy Cross. He holds the College's first tenure ­track position in Deaf Studies. He has chapters in three collections from Gallaudet University Press in addition to published work with Sage Publications, Facts on File Press, and Sign Language Studies. He holds a Ph.D. degree in History from The Ohio State University.

Dr. Octavian Robinson

The Social Justice Framework in Teaching ASL and Deaf Studies: Benefits and Applications

July 1 - 3:00 - Session C - Tag: Deaf Studies/ASL, Social Justice

This workshop will discuss about using the APPS in the ASL classrooms. APPsolutely is the digital way to say absolutely.  It is for the mobile device Apps via smartphones, or tablets for the student to use in the classroom.  There are wonderful apps that you can use it to create a quiz, a presentation, a discussion board, a survey, and to post videos and introduce many more in the classroom use.  I will teach some signs of a glossary of WIFI technology. Your inputs of sign vocabulary would be helpful.    I will give you a list of recommended Apps that you can use it in your ASL classroom.   I will demonstrate this App - Kahoot! - To use it as a step by step with you in the session to use it for the games in the classroom as an example.  After using this Kahoot! Games, you can share your Apps if you have one from your smartphone or tablet with us to gain more Apps to use in the ASL classroom.

Bo Clements is from Tampa, Florida. He is a currently president of the Florida American Sign Language Teachers Association, Inc.  Also, He is the southeast regional director of ASLTA chapters. He holds ASLTA Professional level certification.  He has taught ASL studies at the University of South Florida for going on 19th year.  Bo is a graduate of Gallaudet University with a B.A. degree and also holds an M.S. degree from Florida State University. He is active in the Tampa Bay Deaf Community, and presents workshops at FASLTA, FFLA, and local businesses, such as Chase Corporate – Banks, to educate their employees about Deaf Culture and how best to communicate with their Deaf and Hard of Hearing co-workers and customers via ASL. Bo loves Modern Art, collecting Tiki figures, going to the beach, and traveling. He is a proudly daddy of DODA (Dog of Deaf Adult) - Ryley, a golden retriever. Ryley already knows 15+ signs.

Bo Clements

APPsolutely ASL

July 1 - 3:00 - Session D - Tag: Technology

Between February and November 2016, every four-year college / university program in the United States was contacted to determine whether ASL fulfills entry and / or graduation requirements. More than 5,000 institutions were surveyed total. This presentation will review the survey results, identify which schools do or do not accept ASL, highlight particular reasons some institutions resist acceptance of ASL, and examine specific areas for further advocacy. ASL teachers, administrators, and guidance counselors at the high school level are particularly encouraged to attend, in order to finally be able to answer the common question "Which colleges do or do not accept ASL?"

Jason E. Zinza, Ph.D., is a native signer with 15+ years experience teaching ASL, training teachers, and developing curricular materials. He is a frequent presenter on topics related to ASL teaching, learning, and assessment at the high school and university levels, and consults on teacher certification and licensure issues. He served on ASLTA’s task force to develop national ASL standards, and now chairs the ASL Can-Do Statements committee. Currently, he coordinates the national ASL Honor Society and serves on ACTFL’s Standards Collaboration Board. Dr. Zinza received the T.J. O’Rourke Memorial Award for significant contributions to the field of ASL teacher training in 2007, and the Marie Jean Philip Memorial Award in 2013 for excellence in the field of K-12 ASL instruction. 

Dr. Jason E. Zinza

College Admissions and Graduation Policies Regarding ASL: National Survey Results

July 1 - 3:00 - Session E - Tag: L2Admin